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Photo Update Program

Photo Update Options

  • Upload a new photo of yourself
  • Reset your photo to your Texas State ID card
  • Choose to display no photo at all

Uploading a new photo will replace what people see when communicating with you through Microsoft Outlook or Lync / Skype for Business. 

Note:  New photo uploads will not replace your official Texas State ID card photo.  Contact ID Services with questions about your ID card photo.


Photo Image Guidelines

Submitted photos must adhere to these guidelines:

  • Must be a color photo, reflecting your current appearance
  • Must be taken directly facing the camera (full face view)
  • Must be taken with a neutral (or smiling) expression with both eyes open
  • Must be centered and properly focused
  • Must be sized displaying your head and shoulders only
  • Must be taken in front of a light, solid-colored background.
    • Note: Consider using a white, beige, or grey background as darker backgrounds tend to obscure the subject in the photo.

Photos containing these features do not adhere to the guidelines:

  • Wearing a hat or head covering that obscures the hair or hairline (e.g., a baseball hat or similar), with the exception of those worn daily for religious purposes
  • Accessories (e.g., headphones, sunglasses) or anything obstructing the full face view (e.g., hands, arms)
  • Glare on clear prescription eyeglasses
  • Harsh shadows or low quality
 

File Size and File Type Requirements

  • Image must be square (otherwise, the photo will be stretched or skewed)
  • 3 in. x 3 in. in size (or 900 x 900 pixels)
  • Maximum file size = 5 mb (megabytes)
  • Acceptable file formats: .jpg, .jpeg, .gif, .png

Important Note:

Your photo must be uploaded exactly as specified in the above guidelines.  ITAC does not have the ability to edit or crop your photo for you. If your photo does not follow the above guidelines, your request will not be approved and you will be asked to make corrections and submit a new request.


It's Similar to a Passport Photo

The guidelines on this page are similar to taking a passport photo, except we're okay with smiles too! 
Travel.State.Gov has a great online cropping tool.  Check it out!

Easy Cropper Tool


Sample Correct and Incorrect Photos

Use this guide to learn about correct and incorrect image set up. 
 

Head Position and Background

Incorrect

Correct Suggestions

Head Too Big

Head Too Big

Correct Head Size

Correct Head Size

Crop the image so that your head and shoulders are displayed.

Not Centered

Not Centered

Correct Facing

Correctly Centered

 Be sure to center your head and shoulders on the image.

Not Facing Camera

Not Facing Camera

Correct Facing

Correctly Facing Camera

 Be sure to face forward and look at camera.

Head Tilted

Head Tilted

Correct Pose

Correct Pose

 Keep your head upright and face the camera.  Do not tilt your head.

Image Rotated

Image Rotated

Correct Orientaiton

Correct Orientation

 Make sure that your saved file is rotated properly.

Glare on Glasses

Glare on Glasses

No Glasses Glare

No Glare on Glasses

 Glare on glasses is not acceptable.  Glare can be avoided with a slight downward tilt of the head or glasses, by removing the glasses, or by turning the camera flash off.

Busy Background

Background Not Plain

Plain Background

Plain Backgroun

Use a plain background. Stand or sit in front of a plain wall color or screen to take your photo.

 

Brightness, Contrast, and Color

Incorrect

Correct Suggestions

Photo Too Dark

Photo too dark

Correct Brightness

Correct Brightness

Ensure that there is proper lighting and exposure to avoid ovelry dark photos.

Contrast Too High

Contrast Too High

Correct Contrast

Correct Contrast

 High contrast can be caused by uneven lighting or incorrect camera settings.  Used balanced lighting to minimize shadows on the face and under the chin.

Incorrect Color Cast

Improper Color Casting

Natural Color

Natural Color

 Photo colors are affected by the type of light in the room.  Avoid using lights with color casts or fluorescent lighting.  Use your camera's color balance settings.

 

Lighting and Exposure

Incorrect

Correct Suggestions

Over Exposed

Over Exposed

Correctly Exposed

Correct Exposure

Over-exposure means that the camera received too much light.  Resolution and fine details are lost. Avoid over exposing your image or stading in bright light.

Under Exposed

Under Exposed

Correctly Exposed

Correctly Exposed

 Under-exposed images means tht the camera did not receive enough light.  Avoid this problem by being in a well-lit room or using your camera's flash.

Background
Shadows

Shadows on Background

Background Uniformly Illuminated

Background Uniformly Illuminated

To avoid shadows, stand close to the wall or add a back light between you and the wall to fill in the shadow.

Shadows on
the Face

Shadows on Face

No Shadows
on the Face

Face Uniformly Illumniated

 To reduce face shadows, avoid overhead lighting or lighting that is on either side of your face.

 

Resolution and Print Quality

Incorrect

Correct Suggestions

Low Quality
Visible Pixels

Low Quality - Pixels

High Quality - No  Seen Pixels

High Quality - No Visible Pictures

Image quality is important.  We recommend an image size that is 900 x 900 pixels (3" x 3" with a 300 resolution).  You should not see any visible pixels on the image.

Poorly Focused

Poorly Focused

Clear and Focussed

Correctly Focused

 The person's face should be the point of focus in the photo.  Make sure that the camera is focussed on the person's nose and not the background or any other objectt.

Information courtesy of  Travel.State.Gov